Guardian article: Most biomedical studies fail to report if results differ by sex

8 February, 2019

Dear Neil,

I thought that some members may be interested in the following article: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/feb/07/most-biomedical-studies-...

This refers to a Lancet paper:

Factors affecting sex-related reporting in medical research: a cross-disciplinary bibliometric analysis by Sugimoto et al https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)32995-7/fulltext

Quoting their interpretation:

"Gender disparities in the scientific workforce and scarcity of policies on sex-related reporting at the journal and institutional level could inhibit effective research translation from bench to clinical studies. Diversification in the scientific workforce and in the research populations — from cell lines, to rodents, to humans — is essential to produce the most rigorous and effective medical research."

Julie

HIFA profile: Julie N Reza is a UK-based specialist in communications for biosciences, global health & international development (www.globalbiomedia.co.uk). She predominantly works with NGOs and not-for-profit organisations. Previously she was the senior science editor at TDR, based at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva; prior to this she worked at the Wellcome Trust, UK, leading educational projects on international health topics including trypanosomiasis and trachoma. She has a PhD in immunology and a specialist degree in science communication. She also has several years research and postgraduate teaching experience. She is a member of the HIFA Steering Group and HIFA Social Media Working Group. www.hifa.org/people/steering-group www.hifa.org/people/social-media www.hifa.org/support/members/julie naimareza AT hotmail.com